Ramblings regarding the De La Rue firm’s purchase of the Goodall firm . . .

In the preceding post, I mentioned the fact that Goodall became a part of De La Rue in the 1920s.  That seems to be largely true, but I have never seen an extended discussion of exactly what happened to the Goodall company.  In fact, as I mentioned in this post, long ago, it seems that there is widespread confusion as to what happened between De La Rue and Goodall in 1922.

As late as November 1922, De La Rue advertised itself as “sole agents” for both companies:

[C]arrying in stock a full line of the famous playing cards made by Thomas De La Rue & Co., Ltd., and by Chas. Goodall & Son, Ltd., of London, England.

Huh?  That makes it seem as though the two are still separate entities.

The general impression I receive, overall, is that De La Rue purchased Goodall in late 1921 by buying Goodall stock for $3,000,000.  That is what this source says (that is, The American Stationer and Office Outfitter, December 10, 1921).  However, other things I have seen, as well as a general skepticism on such things, suggest that the situation was not that simple.

A full-page advertisement in The Economist, November 5, 1921, has some details, but they are not really set forth in laymen’s terms.  The article in The American Stationer and Office Outfitter, December 10, 1921, implies strongly that the purchase had taken place — but a closer examination reveals such words as, “the announcement of the purchase,” and, “the purchase price paid by De La Rue . . . is . . .” — which normally would suggest a purchase that has taken place, but could be referring to a transaction that is still in the works.

I know basically nothing about the actual terms of the purchase, in terms of the day-to-day impact on Goodall’s operations.  I do not know upon what date Goodall became the property of De La Rue, or upon what conditions, if any.  I gather that the sale, if that is what it was, took place in either late 1921 or early 1922.

—Tom Sawyer

Saturday, January 5, 2012

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